Share a little biographical information to fill out your profile. This may be shown publicly.

 

We sturen je per e-mail een wachtwoord toe. Soms komt deze e-mail in je spambox terecht.

EDIT: Officiële Trailer én Fifth Gear-reportage ondertussen toegevoegd in de comments!

Men neme één Mercedes SLS (en een tweede voor high-speed camerawerk), de legendarische Mountain Road op het Isle of Man (voor de gelegenheid over 12,5km afgesloten) en een gemotiveerde David Coulthard (die er absoluut 260km/h wil klokken) voor wat de eerste autofilm in 3D moet worden. Die kunnen we hier technisch natuurlijk onmogelijk tonen, maar de Making Of-video beslist wel. En laat dat nu meestal het onderdeel zijn dat ons vaak meer boeit dan het Top Gear-achtige resultaat.

En tot slot nog een kort woordje uitleg over filmen in 3D vanop Wired.com:

“Using two cameras, you’re replicating human vision,” said stereographer (camera technician) Campbell Goodwille. “And by moving the cameras further apart or closer together, you exaggerate or lessen the 3D effect. It’s almost like a volume control for 3D. If you’re shooting a little insect, the cameras might be 5 or 10 millimeters apart, whereas if you’re shooting a landscape you might have them a couple of feet apart. And that’s about getting apparent depth in stuff you don’t normally see. When you look at something a long way away, you don’t get much stereo [depth] effect so we exaggerate that for the screen.”

Speed lies at the heart of the project.

“With 2D, you can cheat the sensation of speed with long lenses or blurred backgrounds, there are all sorts of techniques you can use,” said Geoff Boyle, director of 3D photography. “But none of them work in 3D. It just looks like a cardboard cutout moving in front of the blurred background, very Captain Pugwash and just really, really wrong. The only thing that works really well with cars in 3D is wide lenses. With wide lenses, though, the background appears to move slowly so the only way to get an impression of speed is to go bloody fast.”

[Bron: Wired.com, Hat Tip: Daggie.be]